I was recently faced with a fantastic question. Think about the last time you purchased a new item of clothing. Was it to replace an old, worn out item in your cupboard or was it a season must have? It’s scary to think about how often the latter is true. When was the last time you threw out a piece of clothing because it was absolutely finished, worn out and past the point of a pajama option?

The majority of us don’t wear our clothes long enough for them to reach that stage, because before you open your eyes, the next trend is ‘trending’. Wanting to stay “in season” we rush to the nearest major retail store and save our closet from utter embarrassment. True? Yes, 100%. If you thought that you weren’t part of ‘fast fashion’, think again.

I did a little (A LOT OF) research on fast fashion and it seems that Zara is at the forefront of this retail revolution. The founder, Amancio Ortega, opened his first store in 1975 in Spain and took a different approach to selling his garments. In as little as 2 weeks he would have new designs made and selling in his store, giving his customers fresh looks right through the seasons. Consumers knew that they would find something new every time they went back, but it also caused them to make purchases faster as they realised what they saw in store this week wouldn’t necessarily be in store the next week.
Here’s a quick clip giving us a brief background on Zara and Ortega’s fast fashion brain child.

Just information? Meh, nope. I know the feeling of being ‘in season’ with the latest trends but once we understand at who’s expense we are dressing and buying, it’s not so glamorous anymore. Along with all this research, I couldn’t help but delve into related articles on who makes our clothes. Who are the people running on the hamster wheel, rushing and running to get this fast fashion to us fresh off the runway??
If you haven’t read my posts related to this topic, do yourself a favour, it changed the way I shop completely.

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Tammy
e. southafrica@fashionrevolution.org
www.fashionrevolution.org